John Hupp
emilyonthewall:

johnhupp:

emilyonthewall:

feitclub:

It’s a katakana font (named “ゴウラ”) designed to look like Olde English fancy print
This must be the Japanese equivalent of that “asian” font you see on Chinese takeout boxes
(via a friend-of-a-friend on Facebook. hat-tip to artofemilyo)

This is a pretty good way to assess if you’re a member of the dominant, empowered culture in your community. Cultural appropriation only feels offensive when you’re the minority, and your cultural identity is at risk of erasure. That’s how cultural appropriation conducts its insidious work.
The fetishization (or involuntary adaptation) of “Western” culture is super prevalent in other countries. I can only speak for Central China, but there’s misspelled English all over the place, and hilarious knockoffs at every flea market:

We live during a very weird time, in which cultures are constantly clashing and melding in really strange ways. Cultural appropriation and cultural hegemony are both craptastical side effects of this. Neither are okay. But the difference between the two often comes down to our individual perspective…

Except… isn’t cultural appropriation considered a good thing in Japan? I mean, they pride themselves in being able to do foreign things better than foreigners, and they’re pretty equal-opportunity about it; they don’t do just appropriate Anglo stuff.
For that matter, China seems to have a cultural fixation on copying, but with widely varied and equally equally accepted levels of quality. China seems a bit more easy-going in that regard…
Perhaps the narrative of cultural appropriation being an evil, colonialist/imperialist thing breaks down if we’re talking about large, developed countries copying each other. This is not like the Japanese forcibly assimilating the Ainu or anything like that.

You’re absolutely right to point out that the “wonton font” and this “old english katakana” are not the same at all. They may resemble each other, but they occupy really really different socio-political contexts. 
 I’ve never been to Japan, and I’m wary of making any generalizing observations about a culture I’ve never really experienced…  But I’m pretty sure that Westerners have (mostly) enjoyed a position of power in East Asia. With a few Communist-era exceptions, Caucasians have never been subject to systematic discrimination resulting in widespread poverty, unjust imprisonment, or coerced assimilation. Anglo-Americans in Asia don’t have to worry about their children losing their English language, because English is always taught as a second language. Moreover, Anglo-American culture is ubiquitous, available to be consumed almost anywhere.
There’s nothing inherently wrong with adopting other cultures, until it becomes a way to trivialize and ostracize The Other. That’s what the “wonton font” did to Chinese-Americans. It was largely used by Chinese-style restaurants (not exactly the richest people) as a way to appeal to Westerners, to make the Far East seem simultaneously exotic and completely harmless. And I think that’s why a lot of young Chinese-Americans hate it so much: it reminds us that we have to be exotic but not too weird, smart but not threatening, adapt to Western culture but not lose our parents’… We didn’t get to make any of these rules.
For me, cultural appropriation is still an evil thing, inherited from a violent, colonial past. The truly insidious effects of cultural appropriation happens in the context of an Imperialist aftermath, with which we’re still trying to grapple.

And anyway, this is a really elegant example of Gothic script. The designer obviously know their shit about Blackletter and is an exceptionally talented calligrapher. It would not look out of place in a transliterated illuminated manuscript.By contrast “wonton font” has nothing to do with Chinese calligraphy and has all the panache of Comic Sans. Its use exhibits all the taste of, say, Papyrus on a restaurant menu.

emilyonthewall:

johnhupp:

emilyonthewall:

feitclub:

It’s a katakana font (named “ゴウラ”) designed to look like Olde English fancy print

This must be the Japanese equivalent of that “asian” font you see on Chinese takeout boxes

(via a friend-of-a-friend on Facebook. hat-tip to artofemilyo)

This is a pretty good way to assess if you’re a member of the dominant, empowered culture in your community. Cultural appropriation only feels offensive when you’re the minority, and your cultural identity is at risk of erasure. That’s how cultural appropriation conducts its insidious work.

The fetishization (or involuntary adaptation) of “Western” culture is super prevalent in other countries. I can only speak for Central China, but there’s misspelled English all over the place, and hilarious knockoffs at every flea market:

We live during a very weird time, in which cultures are constantly clashing and melding in really strange ways. Cultural appropriation and cultural hegemony are both craptastical side effects of this. Neither are okay. But the difference between the two often comes down to our individual perspective…

Except… isn’t cultural appropriation considered a good thing in Japan? I mean, they pride themselves in being able to do foreign things better than foreigners, and they’re pretty equal-opportunity about it; they don’t do just appropriate Anglo stuff.

For that matter, China seems to have a cultural fixation on copying, but with widely varied and equally equally accepted levels of quality. China seems a bit more easy-going in that regard…

Perhaps the narrative of cultural appropriation being an evil, colonialist/imperialist thing breaks down if we’re talking about large, developed countries copying each other. This is not like the Japanese forcibly assimilating the Ainu or anything like that.

You’re absolutely right to point out that the “wonton font” and this “old english katakana” are not the same at all. They may resemble each other, but they occupy really really different socio-political contexts. 

I’ve never been to Japan, and I’m wary of making any generalizing observations about a culture I’ve never really experienced…  But I’m pretty sure that Westerners have (mostly) enjoyed a position of power in East Asia. With a few Communist-era exceptions, Caucasians have never been subject to systematic discrimination resulting in widespread poverty, unjust imprisonment, or coerced assimilation. Anglo-Americans in Asia don’t have to worry about their children losing their English language, because English is always taught as a second language. Moreover, Anglo-American culture is ubiquitous, available to be consumed almost anywhere.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with adopting other cultures, until it becomes a way to trivialize and ostracize The Other. That’s what the “wonton font” did to Chinese-Americans. It was largely used by Chinese-style restaurants (not exactly the richest people) as a way to appeal to Westerners, to make the Far East seem simultaneously exotic and completely harmless. And I think that’s why a lot of young Chinese-Americans hate it so much: it reminds us that we have to be exotic but not too weird, smart but not threatening, adapt to Western culture but not lose our parents’… We didn’t get to make any of these rules.

For me, cultural appropriation is still an evil thing, inherited from a violent, colonial past. The truly insidious effects of cultural appropriation happens in the context of an Imperialist aftermath, with which we’re still trying to grapple.

And anyway, this is a really elegant example of Gothic script. The designer obviously know their shit about Blackletter and is an exceptionally talented calligrapher. It would not look out of place in a transliterated illuminated manuscript.

By contrast “wonton font” has nothing to do with Chinese calligraphy and has all the panache of Comic Sans. Its use exhibits all the taste of, say, Papyrus on a restaurant menu.

emilyonthewall:

johnhupp:

emilyonthewall:

feitclub:

It’s a katakana font (named “ゴウラ”) designed to look like Olde English fancy print
This must be the Japanese equivalent of that “asian” font you see on Chinese takeout boxes
(via a friend-of-a-friend on Facebook. hat-tip to artofemilyo)

This is a pretty good way to assess if you’re a member of the dominant, empowered culture in your community. Cultural appropriation only feels offensive when you’re the minority, and your cultural identity is at risk of erasure. That’s how cultural appropriation conducts its insidious work.
The fetishization (or involuntary adaptation) of “Western” culture is super prevalent in other countries. I can only speak for Central China, but there’s misspelled English all over the place, and hilarious knockoffs at every flea market:

We live during a very weird time, in which cultures are constantly clashing and melding in really strange ways. Cultural appropriation and cultural hegemony are both craptastical side effects of this. Neither are okay. But the difference between the two often comes down to our individual perspective…

Except… isn’t cultural appropriation considered a good thing in Japan? I mean, they pride themselves in being able to do foreign things better than foreigners, and they’re pretty equal-opportunity about it; they don’t do just appropriate Anglo stuff.
For that matter, China seems to have a cultural fixation on copying, but with widely varied and equally equally accepted levels of quality. China seems a bit more easy-going in that regard…
Perhaps the narrative of cultural appropriation being an evil, colonialist/imperialist thing breaks down if we’re talking about large, developed countries copying each other. This is not like the Japanese forcibly assimilating the Ainu or anything like that.

You’re absolutely right to point out that the “wonton font” and this “old english katakana” are not the same at all. They may resemble each other, but they occupy really really different socio-political contexts. 
 I’ve never been to Japan, and I’m wary of making any generalizing observations about a culture I’ve never really experienced…  But I’m pretty sure that Westerners have (mostly) enjoyed a position of power in East Asia. With a few Communist-era exceptions, Caucasians have never been subject to systematic discrimination resulting in widespread poverty, unjust imprisonment, or coerced assimilation. Anglo-Americans in Asia don’t have to worry about their children losing their English language, because English is always taught as a second language. Moreover, Anglo-American culture is ubiquitous, available to be consumed almost anywhere.
There’s nothing inherently wrong with adopting other cultures, until it becomes a way to trivialize and ostracize The Other. That’s what the “wonton font” did to Chinese-Americans. It was largely used by Chinese-style restaurants (not exactly the richest people) as a way to appeal to Westerners, to make the Far East seem simultaneously exotic and completely harmless. And I think that’s why a lot of young Chinese-Americans hate it so much: it reminds us that we have to be exotic but not too weird, smart but not threatening, adapt to Western culture but not lose our parents’… We didn’t get to make any of these rules.
For me, cultural appropriation is still an evil thing, inherited from a violent, colonial past. The truly insidious effects of cultural appropriation happens in the context of an Imperialist aftermath, with which we’re still trying to grapple.

I think the better parallel to “wonton font” would be Japanese appropriation of Chinese and Korean culture, which has coincided with more imperialist policies. For example, Japanese kanji characters are historically derived from Chinese characters, versus hiragana and katakana, which are native to Japan.The alternative to imperialism in Japan seems to be hermetic xenophobia, which you see in the Edo period, as well as the present day. You see the same thing in China prior to the Opium Wars. Nativism in the United States peaked during a period when the United States was officially neutral (we were dragged kicking and screaming into both world wars). In China and Japan today, European and American culture is welcomed, but European and American people… not so much. People in China and Japan can be pretty racist.The irony of this situation is that cosmopolitanism seems to peak during periods of imperialism and colonial exploitation. Shanghai in the 1920s was much more diverse than Shanghai today. People of Portuguese descent in Malaysia are today a less-privileged minority. Obviously third or fourth-generation Chinese-Americans live in a much different social and historical context from, say, wealthy Chinese immigrants today.Perhaps the reason the “wonton font” is seen as racist today is that many Westerners do not see the relationships between Western countries and China (more so than Japan) as ones of equals. Is the West exploiting China? Or is China exploiting the West? It depends who you ask.

emilyonthewall:

johnhupp:

emilyonthewall:

feitclub:

It’s a katakana font (named “ゴウラ”) designed to look like Olde English fancy print

This must be the Japanese equivalent of that “asian” font you see on Chinese takeout boxes

(via a friend-of-a-friend on Facebook. hat-tip to artofemilyo)

This is a pretty good way to assess if you’re a member of the dominant, empowered culture in your community. Cultural appropriation only feels offensive when you’re the minority, and your cultural identity is at risk of erasure. That’s how cultural appropriation conducts its insidious work.

The fetishization (or involuntary adaptation) of “Western” culture is super prevalent in other countries. I can only speak for Central China, but there’s misspelled English all over the place, and hilarious knockoffs at every flea market:

We live during a very weird time, in which cultures are constantly clashing and melding in really strange ways. Cultural appropriation and cultural hegemony are both craptastical side effects of this. Neither are okay. But the difference between the two often comes down to our individual perspective…

Except… isn’t cultural appropriation considered a good thing in Japan? I mean, they pride themselves in being able to do foreign things better than foreigners, and they’re pretty equal-opportunity about it; they don’t do just appropriate Anglo stuff.

For that matter, China seems to have a cultural fixation on copying, but with widely varied and equally equally accepted levels of quality. China seems a bit more easy-going in that regard…

Perhaps the narrative of cultural appropriation being an evil, colonialist/imperialist thing breaks down if we’re talking about large, developed countries copying each other. This is not like the Japanese forcibly assimilating the Ainu or anything like that.

You’re absolutely right to point out that the “wonton font” and this “old english katakana” are not the same at all. They may resemble each other, but they occupy really really different socio-political contexts. 

I’ve never been to Japan, and I’m wary of making any generalizing observations about a culture I’ve never really experienced…  But I’m pretty sure that Westerners have (mostly) enjoyed a position of power in East Asia. With a few Communist-era exceptions, Caucasians have never been subject to systematic discrimination resulting in widespread poverty, unjust imprisonment, or coerced assimilation. Anglo-Americans in Asia don’t have to worry about their children losing their English language, because English is always taught as a second language. Moreover, Anglo-American culture is ubiquitous, available to be consumed almost anywhere.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with adopting other cultures, until it becomes a way to trivialize and ostracize The Other. That’s what the “wonton font” did to Chinese-Americans. It was largely used by Chinese-style restaurants (not exactly the richest people) as a way to appeal to Westerners, to make the Far East seem simultaneously exotic and completely harmless. And I think that’s why a lot of young Chinese-Americans hate it so much: it reminds us that we have to be exotic but not too weird, smart but not threatening, adapt to Western culture but not lose our parents’… We didn’t get to make any of these rules.

For me, cultural appropriation is still an evil thing, inherited from a violent, colonial past. The truly insidious effects of cultural appropriation happens in the context of an Imperialist aftermath, with which we’re still trying to grapple.

I think the better parallel to “wonton font” would be Japanese appropriation of Chinese and Korean culture, which has coincided with more imperialist policies. For example, Japanese kanji characters are historically derived from Chinese characters, versus hiragana and katakana, which are native to Japan.

The alternative to imperialism in Japan seems to be hermetic xenophobia, which you see in the Edo period, as well as the present day. You see the same thing in China prior to the Opium Wars. Nativism in the United States peaked during a period when the United States was officially neutral (we were dragged kicking and screaming into both world wars). In China and Japan today, European and American culture is welcomed, but European and American people… not so much. People in China and Japan can be pretty racist.

The irony of this situation is that cosmopolitanism seems to peak during periods of imperialism and colonial exploitation. Shanghai in the 1920s was much more diverse than Shanghai today. People of Portuguese descent in Malaysia are today a less-privileged minority. Obviously third or fourth-generation Chinese-Americans live in a much different social and historical context from, say, wealthy Chinese immigrants today.

Perhaps the reason the “wonton font” is seen as racist today is that many Westerners do not see the relationships between Western countries and China (more so than Japan) as ones of equals. Is the West exploiting China? Or is China exploiting the West? It depends who you ask.

emilyonthewall:

feitclub:

It’s a katakana font (named “ゴウラ”) designed to look like Olde English fancy print
This must be the Japanese equivalent of that “asian” font you see on Chinese takeout boxes
(via a friend-of-a-friend on Facebook. hat-tip to artofemilyo)

This is a pretty good way to assess if you’re a member of the dominant, empowered culture in your community. Cultural appropriation only feels offensive when you’re the minority, and your cultural identity is at risk of erasure. That’s how cultural appropriation conducts its insidious work.
The fetishization (or involuntary adaptation) of “Western” culture is super prevalent in other countries. I can only speak for Central China, but there’s misspelled English all over the place, and hilarious knockoffs at every flea market:

We live during a very weird time, in which cultures are constantly clashing and melding in really strange ways. Cultural appropriation and cultural hegemony are both craptastical side effects of this. Neither are okay. But the difference between the two often comes down to our individual perspective…

Except… isn’t cultural appropriation considered a good thing in Japan? I mean, they pride themselves in being able to do foreign things better than foreigners, and they’re pretty equal-opportunity about it; they don’t do just appropriate Anglo stuff.For that matter, China seems to have a cultural fixation on copying, but with widely varied and equally equally accepted levels of quality. China seems a bit more easy-going in that regard…Perhaps the narrative of cultural appropriation being an evil, colonialist/imperialist thing breaks down if we’re talking about large, developed countries copying each other. This is not like the Japanese forcibly assimilating the Ainu or anything like that.

emilyonthewall:

feitclub:

It’s a katakana font (named “ゴウラ”) designed to look like Olde English fancy print

This must be the Japanese equivalent of that “asian” font you see on Chinese takeout boxes

(via a friend-of-a-friend on Facebook. hat-tip to artofemilyo)

This is a pretty good way to assess if you’re a member of the dominant, empowered culture in your community. Cultural appropriation only feels offensive when you’re the minority, and your cultural identity is at risk of erasure. That’s how cultural appropriation conducts its insidious work.

The fetishization (or involuntary adaptation) of “Western” culture is super prevalent in other countries. I can only speak for Central China, but there’s misspelled English all over the place, and hilarious knockoffs at every flea market:

We live during a very weird time, in which cultures are constantly clashing and melding in really strange ways. Cultural appropriation and cultural hegemony are both craptastical side effects of this. Neither are okay. But the difference between the two often comes down to our individual perspective…

Except… isn’t cultural appropriation considered a good thing in Japan? I mean, they pride themselves in being able to do foreign things better than foreigners, and they’re pretty equal-opportunity about it; they don’t do just appropriate Anglo stuff.

For that matter, China seems to have a cultural fixation on copying, but with widely varied and equally equally accepted levels of quality. China seems a bit more easy-going in that regard…

Perhaps the narrative of cultural appropriation being an evil, colonialist/imperialist thing breaks down if we’re talking about large, developed countries copying each other. This is not like the Japanese forcibly assimilating the Ainu or anything like that.

Here for the the “Urban Interventions” panel discussion with John Southern, Tiffany Chen, Brian Ulaszewski, Jenna Didier and Eric Leocadio. (at UAM csulb)

Here for the the “Urban Interventions” panel discussion with John Southern, Tiffany Chen, Brian Ulaszewski, Jenna Didier and Eric Leocadio. (at UAM csulb)

"Electro-Data Scheduling Systems"

"Electro-Data Scheduling Systems"

Just got my check for $11.45 from the iBooks antitrust settlement. I’m soooo glad Amazon won that lawsuit!

Just got my check for $11.45 from the iBooks antitrust settlement. I’m soooo glad Amazon won that lawsuit!

The Wild Oats presence at Fresh & Easy is growing… #yucaipa #freshandeasy #nophotographyallowed (at Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market - Long Beach & 5th)

The Wild Oats presence at Fresh & Easy is growing… #yucaipa #freshandeasy #nophotographyallowed (at Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market - Long Beach & 5th)

Soy Cappucino (at Berlin by Portfolio Coffeehouse)

Soy Cappucino (at Berlin by Portfolio Coffeehouse)

Sidewalk seating (at Sweet Dixie Kitchen)

Sidewalk seating (at Sweet Dixie Kitchen)

I’ll wait till it goes on sale… (at Barneys New York, Beverly Hills)

I’ll wait till it goes on sale… (at Barneys New York, Beverly Hills)